Living with
peripheral
attacks

<p>Living with<br />
peripheral<br />
attacks</p>

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June, Kent.

“I treat pretty much all of my peripheral attacks these days, but my early management of the disease was not as good as it is now and at times I felt like they were beginning to control my life. I couldn’t brush my teeth, wash my hair or shower. They can make some aspects of life very difficult. My advice to anyone else who has peripheral attacks that affect their day-to-day life would be: get access to treatment and regularly discuss how you can better manage your peripheral attacks with your doctor or nurse.”

June
June
June
Nicky
Nicky
Nicky

Nicky, Birmingham.

“I haven’t always treated every peripheral attack that I have. I always thought: ‘It’s only my foot’, and would feel bad for using treatment. This all changed because of a friend of mine, who asked me why I wasn’t treating if it meant the attacks would spread. So the next time I went back to my consultant I talked to him about it and he made me realise that they are affecting my day-to-day life and so I should be treating them. Now, they no longer affect me!”

Rachel, Somerset.

“I have a 3-year-old and peripheral attacks can make being a mum a challenge. When she was a baby I would worry that an attack might mean I couldn’t hold her. I don’t let the attacks control me anymore though and other people shouldn’t either. There are options and you should discuss them with your doctor.”

Rachel
Rachel
Rachel
Andy
Andy
Andy

Andy, Newport.

“My hands and feet are where I get most of my peripheral attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) although my condition is generally kept under control by medication and luckily I only ever get 4 or 5 a year. Peripheral attacks in my feet are much more of a problem because I can’t get my shoes on. As a manager based on a live train maintenance yard, I have to wear safety boots. If I can’t get my boots on then I can’t go to work.”